Courses

Stanford STAND finds these fall quarter courses interesting, maybe you will too!

ANTHRO 145: Race and Power (ANTHRO 245, CSRE 145F)

This course examines how race is made. We will pay close attention to how people engage with material, economic, scientific, and cultural forces to articulate human group difference as a given, and even natural. In this seminar, we will look at the construction of race as a literally made phenomenon, where historical, colonial, bodily, market, and humanitarian constituent elements both circulate and sediment racial understandings. To focus our readings and discussions we will divide this vast terrain into three units: race and the colonial encounter, race and biopower, and race and capital.

Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

Instructors: Fullwiley, D. (PI)

ANTHRO 147: Nature, Culture, Heritage (ANTHRO 247)

Seminar. Shared histories of natural and cultural heritage and their subsequent trajectories into the present. How thought about archaeological sites and natural landscapes have undergone transformations due to factors including indigenous rights, green politics, and international tourism. The development of key ideas including conservation, wilderness, sustainability, indigenous knowledge, non-renewability and diversity. Case studies draw on cultural and natural sites from Africa, the Americas and Australia.

Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

Instructors: Meskell, L. (PI)

COMM 104W: Reporting, Writing, and Understanding the News

Techniques of news reporting and writing. The value and role of news in democratic societies. Gateway class to journalism. Prerequisite for all COMM 177/277 classes. Limited enrollment. Preference to sophomores and juniors.

Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

Instructors: Zacharia, J. (PI)

CSRE 176S: Mindful Public Narrative: Telling Our Stories of Identity, Community, and Agency (TAPS 176S)

Mindful public narrative is a process of reflective practice that can guide us in the vital challenge of finding meaning through acting to make ourselves better persons and the world a better place. Through greater understanding of who we are as individual selves and as parts of something beyond ourselves we develop the awareness and courage to turn values into action. We will develop our personal stories of identity, community, and agency that are deeply connected to our wounds and our dreams, and tell them in a respectful and disciplined community of discourse to help empower us to act. In this ¿narrative¿ approach stories teach us how to act and inspire us with the courage to act by communicating our values through emotions. Our ¿public¿ narrative offers others a story of who we are in terms of race, sex, class, religion, and nation, what we believe, why we do what we do and with whom, and where we hope to lead. We are ¿mindful¿ inquirers in using awareness of self in our studies, bringing attention to where we are in the present moment.

Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

Schedule for CSRE 176S

ETHICSOC 171: Justice (IPS 208, PHIL 171, PHIL 271, POLISCI 3P, POLISCI 136S, POLISCI 336S, PUBLPOL 103C, PUBLPOL 307)

Focus is on the ideal of a just society, and the place of liberty and equality in it, in light of contemporary theories of justice and political controversies. Topics include financing schools and elections, regulating markets, discriminating against people with disabilities, and enforcing sexual morality. Counts as Writing in the Major for PoliSci majors.

Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

Instructors: Cohen, J. (PI)

FEMGEN 129: Critical Issues in International Women’s Health (HUMBIO 129)

Women’s lives, from childhood through adolescence, reproductive years, and aging. Economic, social, and human rights factors, and the importance of women’s capacities to have good health and manage their lives in the face of societal pressures and obstacles. Emphasis is on life or death issues of women’s health that depend on their capacity to negotiate or feel empowered, including maternal mortality, violence, HIV/AIDS, reproductive health, and sex trafficking. Organizations addressing these issues. A requirement of this class is participation in public blogs. Prerequisites: Human Biology core or equivalent or consent of instructor.

Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

Instructors: Murray, A. (PI)

HISTORY 48N: African History through Literature and Film

Literary and cinematic works as a window into the history of sub-Saharan Africa.; and the difficulty of using artistic works as historical sources, the value of art as representation and artifact of the past. Premodern traditions of political narrative; art in the era of the slave trade; the impact of colonialism on African intellectuals; the political uses of art by nationalists; and the struggle to represent rapidly changing social and culture norms.

Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-AII | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

Instructors: Hanretta, S. (PI)

HISTORY 96: Worlds of Gandhi

Place the paradox of Gandhi in context of global convulsions of 20th century. Gandhi lived across continents; maturing in South Africa, struggling in India, attaining celebrity in Europe. As leader of masses, his method of Satyagraha was distinctively at odds with his times. Yet, he also privileged sacrifice, dying, even euthanasia. In a world beset by fear and war, Gandhi’s complex theory of nonviolence is compelling. What kind of nonviolent politics did Gandhi envision after Fascism, Auschwitz, Hiroshima, and Pakistan?

Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ER, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

Instructors: Kumar, A. (PI)

HISTORY 103F: Introduction to Military History

Introduces students to the rich history of military affairs and, at the same time, examines the ways in which we think of change and continuity in military history. How did war evolve from ancient times, both in styles of warfare and perceptions of war? What is the nature of the relationship between war and society? Is there such a thing as a Western way of war? What role does technology play in transforming military affairs? What is a military revolution and can it be manufactured or induced? Chronologically following the evolution of warfare from Ancient Greece to present day so-called new wars, we will continuously investigate how the interdependencies between technological advances, social change, philosophical debates and economic pressures both shaped and were influenced by war.

Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

Instructors: Vardi, G. (PI)

HISTORY 202G: Peoples, Armies and Governments of the Second World War (HISTORY 302G)

Clausewitz conceptualized war as always consisting of a trinity of passion, chance, and reason, mirrored, respectively, in the people, army and government. Following Clausewitz, this course examines the peoples, armies, and governments that shaped World War II. Analyzes the ideological, political, diplomatic and economic motivations and constraints of the belligerents and their resulting strategies, military planning and fighting. Explores the new realities of everyday life on the home fronts and the experiences of non-combatants during the war, the final destruction of National Socialist Germany and Imperial Japan, and the emerging conflict between the victors. How the peoples, armies and governments involved perceived their possibilities and choices as a means to understand the origins, events, dynamics and implications of the greatest war in history.

Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

Instructors: Vardi, G. (PI)

HISTORY 203C: History of Ignorance

Scholars pay a lot of attention to knowledge¿how it arises and impacts society¿but much less attention has been given to ignorance, even though its impacts are equally profound. Here we explore the political history of ignorance, through case studies including: corporate denials of harms from particular products (tobacco, asbestos), climate change denialism, and creationist rejections of Darwinian evolution. Students will be expected to produce a research paper tracing the origins and impact of a particular form of ignorance.

Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

Instructors: Proctor, R. (PI)

HISTORY 204G: War and Society (HISTORY 304G)

How Western societies and cultures have responded to modern warfare. The relationship between its destructive capacity and effects on those who produce, are subject to, and must come to terms with its aftermath. Literary representations of WW I; destructive psychological effects of modern warfare including those who take pleasure in killing; changes in relations between the genders; consequences of genocidal ideology and racial prejudice; the theory of just war and its practical implementation; and how wars are commemorated.

Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

Instructors: Weiner, A. (PI)

HISTORY 228: Circles of Hell: Poland in World War II (HISTORY 328, JEWISHST 282, JEWISHST 382)

Looks at the experience and representation of Poland’s wartime history from the Nazi-Soviet Pact (1939) to the aftermath of Yalta (1945). Examines Nazi and Soviet ideology and practice in Poland, as well as the ways Poles responded, resisted, and survived. Considers wartime relations among Polish citizens, particularly Poles and Jews. In this regard, interrogates the traditional self-characterization of Poles as innocent victims, looking at their relationship to the Holocaust, thus engaging in a passionate debate still raging in Polish society.

Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

Instructors: Jolluck, K. (PI)

HISTORY 261G: Presidents and Foreign Policy in Modern History (INTNLREL 173)

Nothing better illustrates the evolution of the modern presidency than the arena of foreign policy. This class will examine the changing role and choices of successive presidential administrations over the past century, examining such factors as geopolitics, domestic politics, the bureaucracy, ideology, psychology, and culture. Students will be encouraged to think historically about the institution of the presidency, while examining specific case studies, from the First World War to the conflicts of the 21st century.

Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

Instructors: Rakove, R. (PI)

IPS 210: The Politics of International Humanitarian Action

The relationship between humanitarianism and politics in international responses to civil conflicts and forced displacement. Focus is on policy dilemmas and choices, and the consequences of action or inaction. Case studies include northern Iraq (Kurdistan), Bosnia, Rwanda, Kosovo, and Darfur.

Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

Instructors: Morris, E. (PI)

IPS 230: Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law (INTNLREL 114D, POLISCI 114D, POLISCI 314D)

Links among the establishment of democracy, economic growth, and the rule of law. How democratic, economically developed states arise. How the rule of law can be established where it has been historically absent. Variations in how such systems function and the consequences of institutional forms and choices. How democratic systems have arisen in different parts of the world. Available policy instruments used in international democracy, rule of law, and development promotion efforts.

Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

Instructors: Diamond, L. (PI) ; Stoner, K. (PI)

INTNLREL 140A: International Law and International Relations

What is the character of international legal rules? Do they matter in international politics, and if so, to what degree? The foundational theories, principles, and sources of public international law. Prominent theories of international relations and how they address the role of law in international politics. Practical problems such as human rights, humanitarian intervention, and enforcement of criminal law. International law as a dynamic set of rules, at times influenced by power, at other times constraining it, but always essential to studying international relations.

Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

Instructors: Lutomski, P. (PI)

INTNLREL 140C: The U.S., U.N. Peacekeeping, and Humanitarian War

The involvement of U.S. and the UN in major wars and international interventions since the 1991 Gulf War. The UN Charter’s provisions on the use of force, the origins and evolution of peacekeeping, the reasons for the breakthrough to peacemaking and peace enforcement in the 90s, and the ongoing debates over the legality and wisdom of humanitarian intervention. Case studies include Croatia and Bosnia, Somalia, Rwanda, Kosovo, East Timor, and Afghanistan.

Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

Instructors: Patenaude, B. (PI)

INTNLREL 141A: Camera as Witness: International Human Rights Documentaries

Rarely screened documentary films, focusing on global problems, human rights issues, and aesthetic challenges in making documentaries on international topics. Meetings with filmmakers.

Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

Instructors: Bojic, J. (PI)

INTNLREL 157: The Political Economy of the Arab Revolutions

Many observers prefer to interpret the popular uprisings that swept through the Middle East in 2011 as a mere reaction to decades of authoritarian rule and human rights abuses. Conversely, others have underlined the deeper and more structural socio-economic drivers of revolt. This course aims at providing an in-depth analysis of Arab revolutions by employing the tools of political economy and departing from the conviction that revolts are the culmination of lengthy and complex processes rather than just occasional breakdown of authoritarian regimes

Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

Instructors: Adly, A. (PI)

POLISCI 140L: China in World Politics (POLISCI 340L)

The implications of the rise of China in contemporary world politics and for American foreign policy, including issues such as arms and nuclear proliferation, regional security arrangements, international trade and investment, human rights, environmental problems, and the Taiwan and Tibet questions.

Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

Instructors: Miller, A. (PI)

POLISCI 334: Philanthropy and Civil Society (EDUC 374, SOC 374)

Associated with the Center for Philanthropy and Civil Society (PACS). Year-long workshop for doctoral students and advanced undergraduates writing senior theses on the nature of civil society or philanthropy. Focus is on pursuit of progressive research and writing contributing to the current scholarly knowledge of the nonprofit sector and philanthropy. Accomplished in a large part through peer review. Readings include recent scholarship in aforementioned fields. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 units.

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

Instructors: Powell, W. (PI) ;Reich, R. (PI)

POLISCI 337S: Seminar on Liberation Technologies (CS 546)

This one-unit seminar will present speakers relevant in a variety ofnnways to how various forms of information technology are being used tonndefend human rights, improve governance, deepen democracy, empower thennpoor, promote economic development, protect the environment, enhancennpublic health, and pursue a variety of other social goods.

Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

Instructors: Cohen, J. (PI) ; Diamond, L. (PI) ; Winograd, T. (PI)

SOC 118: Social Movements and Collective Action (SOC 218)

Why social movements arise, who participates in them, the obstacles they face, the tactics they choose, and how to gauge movement success or failure. Theory and empirical research. Application of concepts and methods to social movements such as civil rights, environmental justice, antiglobalization, and anti-war.

Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

Instructors: Wright, R. (PI)

PEDS 225: Humanitarian Aid and Politics

Open to medical students, graduate students, and undergraduate students. Examines the moral dilemmas and political realities that complicate the delivery of humanitarian aid, especially when undertaken by the United Nations and non-governmental organizations (NGOs). Emphasis is on what humanitarians call “complex humanitarian emergencies”: crises often characterized by famine and/or epidemic disease and typically the result of war and/or civil war. Provides background into the history of humanitarian aid, though focus is on the post-Cold War era, up to the recent crises in Libya and Syria.

Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

Instructors: Patenaude, B. (PI)

Comments are closed.